• On My Bookshelf
  • Teaching Resources
  • Privacy Policy

The Literary Maven

March 3, 2017

How to teach shakespeare's romeo and juliet: act iv.

Whether you are a teacher tackling William Shakespeare's play Romeo and Juliet for the first time or you are a veteran looking to change how you’ve taught it in the past, it is always helpful to find out how another teacher plans it all out. Read on to find out what scenes I focus on in Act IV and why, how my students read and act out those scenes, and what activities I use to extend learning and make connections.

You Might Also Like

Post a comment.

' height=

Find It Fast

Get support, shop my tpt store, top categories.

  • my bookshelf

Post Topics

Blog archive.

  • ►  December (3)
  • ►  August (4)
  • ►  July (10)
  • ►  June (2)
  • ►  February (2)
  • ►  November (3)
  • ►  October (2)
  • ►  September (2)
  • ►  July (2)
  • ►  June (9)
  • ►  May (1)
  • ►  April (1)
  • ►  March (1)
  • ►  February (1)
  • ►  January (1)
  • ►  December (1)
  • ►  November (2)
  • ►  October (1)
  • ►  September (1)
  • ►  June (1)
  • ►  May (3)
  • ►  February (6)
  • ►  January (5)
  • ►  December (2)
  • ►  October (6)
  • ►  September (6)
  • ►  August (5)
  • ►  July (6)
  • ►  May (2)
  • ►  April (4)
  • ►  March (4)
  • ►  February (4)
  • ►  December (6)
  • ►  November (10)
  • ►  October (13)
  • ►  September (10)
  • ►  August (14)
  • ►  July (7)
  • ►  May (4)
  • ►  April (7)
  • ►  March (10)
  • ►  February (7)
  • ►  January (7)
  • ►  November (4)
  • ►  October (8)
  • ►  September (13)
  • ►  August (13)
  • ►  July (9)
  • ►  June (6)
  • ►  May (7)
  • ►  April (13)
  • ►  March (12)
  • ►  February (11)
  • ►  January (12)
  • ►  December (7)
  • ►  November (11)
  • ►  October (14)
  • ►  August (12)
  • ►  July (12)
  • ►  June (7)
  • ►  May (8)
  • ►  April (14)
  • On My Bookshelf: The Crossover by Kwame Alexander
  • #2ndaryELA Twitter Chat Topic: Struggling Readers ...
  • Avoiding Teacher Burnout: Tips for Sustaining Your...
  • On My Bookshelf: Monsters of Men by Patrick Ness
  • #2ndaryELA Twitter Chat Topic: Avoiding Teacher Bu...
  • On My Bookshelf: The Nightingale by Kristin Hannah
  • #2ndaryELA Twitter Chat Topic: Growth Mindset
  • Cultivate A Culturally Relevant Classroom: Recogni...
  • On My Bookshelf: Where Things Come Back by John Co...
  • #2ndaryELA Twitter Chat Topic: Culturally Relevant...
  • How to Teach Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet: Makin...
  • How to Teach Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet: Act V
  • How to Teach Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet: Act IV
  • How to Teach Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet: Act III
  • How to Teach Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet: Act II
  • How to Teach Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet: Act I
  • How to Teach Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet: Intro...
  • ►  October (12)
  • ►  July (11)
  • ►  June (5)
  • ►  May (14)
  • ►  February (13)
  • ►  January (13)
  • ►  December (8)
  • ►  November (13)
  • ►  September (12)
  • ►  August (11)
  • ►  May (5)
  • ►  October (4)
  • ►  September (4)
  • ►  August (3)
  • ►  July (4)

Romeo and Juliet

romeo and juliet act 4 lessons

Romeo and Juliet Shakescleare Translation

romeo and juliet act 4 lessons

Romeo and Juliet Translation Act 4, Scene 1

FRIAR LAWRENCE and PARIS enter.

FRIAR LAWRENCE

On Thursday, sir? The time is very short.

On Thursday, sir? That’s extremely soon.

My father Capulet will have it so, And I am nothing slow to slack his haste.

My father-in-law Capulet wants it that way, and I’m not at all interested in slowing him down.

You say you do not know the lady’s mind. Uneven is the course. I like it not.

You say you don’t know what Juliet wants. That’s a treacherous road. I don’t like it.

Everything you need for every book you read.

Immoderately she weeps for Tybalt’s death, And therefore have I little talked of love, For Venus smiles not in a house of tears. Now, sir, her father counts it dangerous That she do give her sorrow so much sway, And in his wisdom hastes our marriage To stop the inundation of her tears— Which, too much minded by herself alone, May be put from her by society. Now do you know the reason of this haste.

She’s grieving too much over Tybalt’s death, so I haven’t talked to her about love. Romantic love can’t flourish during times of mourning. Now, sir, her father thinks it’s dangerous that she has given herself so fully to sorrow. In his wisdom, he’s rushing our marriage in order to stop her tears. She is alone all the time and thinking too much about her grief. Some company might help her to stop crying. Now you know the reason for this hurry to the wedding.

[Aside] I would I knew not why it should be slowed.— Look, sir, here comes the lady toward my cell.

[To himself] I wish I didn’t know the reason why it should be slowed down. 

[To PARIS] Look, sir, here comes the lady toward my cell.

Happily met, my lady and my wife.

I’m happy to see you, my lady and my wife.

JULIET enters.

That may be, sir, when I may be a wife.

That might be, sir, when I’m married.

That “may be” must be, love, on Thursday next.

That “may be” will be, on Thursday, my love.

What must be shall be.

What must be will be.

That’s a certain text.

That’s a certain truth.

Come you to make confession to this Father?

Have you come to make confession to Father Lawrence?

To answer that, I should confess to you.

If I answered that, I’d be confessing to you.

Do not deny to him that you love me.

Don’t deny to him that you love me.

I will confess to you that I love him.

I’ll confess to you that I love him.

So will ye, I am sure, that you love me.

I'm sure you will also confess that you love me.

If I do so, it will be of more price Being spoke behind your back than to your face.

If I do so, it will be worth more if I say it behind your back than if I say it to your face.

Poor soul, thy face is much abused with tears.

Poor dear, your face has been abused by so many tears.

The tears have got small victory by that, For it was bad enough before their spite.

The tears haven’t won much, since my face wasn’t all that nice before I started to cry.

Thou wrong’st it more than tears with that report.

Now you’re abusing your face to say something untrue about it like that.

That is no slander, sir, which is a truth, And what I spake, I spake it to my face.

It is no lie, sir. It’s the truth. And what I said, I said to my face.

Thy face is mine, and thou hast slandered it.

Your face is mine, and you have slandered it.

It may be so, for it is not mine own.— Are you at leisure, holy Father, now, Or shall I come to you at evening mass?

That may be true, since my face is not my own. 

[To FRIAR LAWRENCE] Are you free, Father, or should I come to you at evening mass?

My leisure serves me, pensive daughter, now.— My lord, we must entreat the time alone.

I have time now, my sad daughter. 

[To PARIS] My lord, we must ask you for some time alone.

God shield I should disturb devotion!— Juliet, on Thursday early will I rouse ye. [Kisses her] Till then, adieu, and keep this holy kiss.

God forbid that I should intrude on confession! Juliet, I will wake you early on Thursday. [Kissing her] Until then, goodbye, and keep this holy kiss.

PARIS exits.

O, shut the door! And when thou hast done so, Come weep with me, past hope, past cure, past help.

Oh, shut the door! And when you’ve done that, come weep with me. My situation is beyond hope, beyond cure, beyond help!

O Juliet, I already know thy grief. It strains me past the compass of my wits. I hear thou must, and nothing may prorogue it, On Thursday next be married to this county.

Oh, Juliet, I already know why you’re so sad. It’s too difficult a problem for me to know how to solve. I’ve heard that on the coming Thursday you must marry this count, and nothing can delay it.

Tell me not, Friar, that thou hear’st of this, Unless thou tell me how I may prevent it. If in thy wisdom thou canst give no help, Do thou but call my resolution wise, And with this knife I’ll help it presently. [Shows him a knife] God joined my heart and Romeo’s, thou our hands. And ere this hand, by thee to Romeo sealed, Shall be the label to another deed, Or my true heart with treacherous revolt Turn to another, this shall slay them both. Therefore out of thy long-experienced time, Give me some present counsel, or, behold, ‘Twixt my extremes and me this bloody knife Shall play the umpire, arbitrating that Which the commission of thy years and art Could to no issue of true honor bring. Be not so long to speak. I long to die If what thou speak’st speak not of remedy.

Friar, don't tell me that you’ve heard all this unless you can tell me how I can prevent it. If with all your wisdom even you can’t help, then you must agree that my resolution to die is wise. And this knife will help me do it. [Revealing a knife] God joined my heart to Romeo’s, and you joined our hands. Before my hand or heart—which are bound to Romeo—are given to another man, I’ll use this knife to kill myself. So either use your long experience and education to give me some advice about what to do, or watch as I use this knife like a judge to honorably resolve the extreme situation in which I’m caught. Don’t wait long to speak. I want to die if what you say isn’t a solution.

Hold, daughter. I do spy a kind of hope, Which craves as desperate an execution As that is desperate which we would prevent. If, rather than to marry County Paris, Thou hast the strength of will to slay thyself, Then is it likely thou wilt undertake A thing like death to chide away this shame, That copest with death himself to ’scape from it. An if thou darest, I’ll give thee remedy.

Wait, daughter. I see a ray of hope. But it will require an act as desperate as the situation we want to avoid. If you have the willpower to kill yourself rather than marry Count Paris, then you’ll likely agree to experience something like death to escape this problem. You can wrestle with death itself in order to escape from death. If you dare to do it, I’ll give you the solution.

O, bid me leap, rather than marry Paris, From off the battlements of yonder tower; Or walk in thievish ways; or bid me lurk Where serpents are; chain me with roaring bears; Or shut me nightly in a charnel house, O’ercovered quite with dead men’s rattling bones, With reeky shanks and yellow chapless skulls; Or bid me go into a new-made grave And hide me with a dead man in his shroud— Things that, to hear them told, have made me tremble— And I will do it without fear or doubt, To live an unstained wife to my sweet love.

To avoid marrying Paris I’d jump from the top of a tower; or walk down thief-infested alleys; or sit among a nest of serpents; or be chained up with wild bears; or be shut up every night in a crypt full of rattling bones, stinking flesh, and skulls without jawbones; or climb into a freshly dug grave and hide beneath the shroud of a dead man. All those things make me tremble when I hear them said, but I’ll do them without fear or dread in order to be a pure wife to my sweet love.

Hold, then. Go home, be merry. Give consent To marry Paris. Wednesday is tomorrow. Tomorrow night look that thou lie alone. Let not the Nurse lie with thee in thy chamber. [Shows her a vial] Take thou this vial, being then in bed, And this distillèd liquor drink thou off, When presently through all thy veins shall run A cold and drowsy humor, for no pulse Shall keep his native progress, but surcease. No warmth, no breath shall testify thou livest. The roses in thy lips and cheeks shall fade To wanny ashes, thy eyes’ windows fall Like death when he shuts up the day of life. Each part, deprived of supple government, Shall, stiff and stark and cold, appear like death. And in this borrowed likeness of shrunk death Thou shalt continue two and forty hours, And then awake as from a pleasant sleep. Now, when the bridegroom in the morning comes To rouse thee from thy bed, there art thou dead. Then, as the manner of our country is, In thy best robes uncovered on the bier Thou shalt be borne to that same ancient vault Where all the kindred of the Capulets lie. In the meantime, against thou shalt awake, Shall Romeo by my letters know our drift, And hither shall he come, and he and I Will watch thy waking, and that very night Shall Romeo bear thee hence to Mantua. And this shall free thee from this present shame, If no inconstant toy, nor womanish fear, Abate thy valor in the acting it.

Be strong, then. Go home, be cheerful, and agree to marry Paris. Tomorrow is Wednesday. Tomorrow night make sure that you go to sleep alone. Don’t let the Nurse sleep in your bedroom. [Showing her a vial] Drink this liquor when you’re in bed. A cold, sleepy feeling will then run through your veins, and your pulse will cease. Your body will go cold, and you’ll stop breathing. The red of your lips and cheeks will fade to a pale ashen color, and your eyelids will close just as if you were dead. Your body will lose control over its own movement, and will become stiff as that of a corpse. You’ll remain in this simulation of death for forty-two hours, and then you’ll wake as if from a pleasant sleep. So when the bridegroom comes to wake you from your bed in the morning, he will think that you are dead. Then, as is the tradition of our city, you’ll be dressed in your best clothes and placed on an uncovered funeral bier, and carried to the Capulet tomb that holds all of your dead relatives. Meanwhile, before you wake up, I’ll send word to Romeo of our plan. He’ll come here, and we’ll keep a watch over you as you wake. That night, Romeo will take you with him to Mantua. So, as long as you don’t change your mind or let your womanly fear interfere with your courage, you’ll be free from the current situation which threatens to force you into sin.

Give me, give me! O, tell not me of fear!

Give it to me! Don’t talk to me about fear.

[Gives her the vial] Hold. Get you gone. Be strong and prosperous In this resolve. I’ll send a friar with speed To Mantua with my letters to thy lord.

[Giving her the vial] Now go. Be strong and good luck. I’ll send a friar speeding to Mantua with my letter to Romeo.

Love give me strength, and strength shall help afford. Farewell, dear father.

Love, give me strength, and that strength will help me. Goodbye, dear father.

They exit separately.

They exit in opposite directions.

The LitCharts.com logo.

Website navigation

The Folger Shakespeare

Romeo and Juliet - Act 4, scene 5

Download romeo and juliet.

Last updated: Fri, Jul 31, 2015

  • PDF Download as PDF
  • DOC (for MS Word, Apple Pages, Open Office, etc.) without line numbers Download as DOC (for MS Word, Apple Pages, Open Office, etc.) without line numbers
  • DOC (for MS Word, Apple Pages, Open Office, etc.) with line numbers Download as DOC (for MS Word, Apple Pages, Open Office, etc.) with line numbers
  • HTML Download as HTML
  • TXT Download as TXT
  • XML Download as XML
  • TEISimple XML (annotated with MorphAdorner for part-of-speech analysis) Download as TEISimple XML (annotated with MorphAdorner for part-of-speech analysis)

Navigate this work

Act 4, scene 5.

The Nurse finds Juliet in the deathlike trance caused by the Friar’s potion and announces Juliet’s death. Juliet’s parents and Paris join the Nurse in lamentation. Friar Lawrence interrupts them and begins to arrange Juliet’s funeral. The scene closes with an exchange of wordplay between Capulet’s servant Peter and Paris’s musicians.

Stay connected

Find out what’s on, read our latest stories, and learn how you can get involved.

Curriculum  /  ELA  /  9th Grade  /  Unit 11: Romeo and Juliet  /  Lesson 4

Romeo and Juliet

Lesson 4 of 23

Readings and Materials

Target task, key questions.

Analyze Shakespeare’s characterization of the three female characters introduced in act 1, scene 3.

Play:  Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare  — Act 1, Scene 3 (pp. 33–41)

We participate in the Amazon Associate program. This means that if you use this link to make an Amazon purchase, we receive a small portion of the proceeds, which support our non-profit mission.

Unlock features to optimize your prep time, plan engaging lessons, and monitor student progress.

Tasks that represents the peak thinking of the lesson - mastery will indicate whether or not objective was achieved

Multiple Choice

The line “Nurse, give leave a while. We must talk in secret, -- Nurse, come back again,” (lines 8–9) reveals what about Lady Capulet?

What does Juliet’s response to Lady Capulet in lines 103–105, “I’ll look to like, if looking liking move. But no more deep will I endart mine eye than your consent gives strength to make fly,” seem to reveal about her relationship with her parents?

Writing Prompt

How is Juliet’s relationship with her nurse different from her relationship with her mother? Use evidence from the scene to support your answer.

Questions about the text that will help guide the students understanding

  • Why does Lady Capulet ask the nurse to stay? What does this show about Lady Capulet? About her relationship with her daughter?
  • How does Shakespeare show the reader that Juliet is much closer with her nurse than with her mother? Track the ways.
  • In lines 40–65, the nurse is relaying a joke that her husband once told about Juliet. What do we learn about Juliet (and other women’s lives in Verona at the time) through this joke? When does the nurse stop telling the joke? When does she not? What does this imply?
  • What is Juliet’s initial response to her mother’s suggestion of marriage? How does Lady Capulet respond to Juliet? Whose response seems wiser?
  • What does Juliet’s response to her mother at the end of the scene seem to imply?
  • Juliet and her mother seem to be very different women. What evidence does Shakespeare provide to show this?
  • Romeo and Juliet — Prologue (p. 7); Act 1, Scene 1 (pp. 9–15)
  • Romeo and Juliet — Prologue
  • Street Love — Prologue

Explain the function of the prologue in Romeo and Juliet . 

Analyze the conflict in act 1, scene 1.

  • Romeo and Juliet — Act 1, Scene 1 (pp. 17–25)
  • “If No Love Is, Oh God, What Fele I So”
  • “Petrarch”

Analyze Shakespeare’s characterizations of Romeo and Benvolio.

Analyze how Shakespeare continues to develop the theme of fate in act 1, scene 2.

Analyze Shakespeare’s characterization of Mercutio and describe his relationship with Romeo. 

Analyze Shakespeare’s characterization of Romeo.

Explain in a well-crafted essay how Shakespeare and Luhrmann each create mood in act 1, scene 5.

Explain how the interactions between Romeo and Juliet develop the themes of the play.

Analyze how the interactions between Romeo and Friar Lawrence develop the conflict of the play.

Examine the differences between Romeo the lover and Romeo the friend.

Analyze how Shakespeare develops the theme of young love in act 2, scenes 5-6.

Identify instances of foreshadowing in act 2, scenes 5-6.

Analyze how the events of act 3, scene 1 further communicate the theme of fate.

Analyze the events of act 3, scene 2 and the impact they have on the plot development.

Compare Romeo’s and Juliet’s reactions to his banishment and analyze what these reactions reveal about character and theme.

Analyze the connections drawn between love and death in act 3, scene 5.

Analyze Juliet’s character development in act 3, scene 5.

Analyze Juliet’s actions and motivations for her actions in act 4, scenes 1–3.

Analyze how Shakespeare develops the theme of young love in act 4, scenes 1-3.

Explain how Myers draws on and transforms ideas from Romeo and Juliet to develop the themes, characters, and/or conflict of Street Love .

Analyze the individual characters’ reactions to Juliet’s death.

Identify how the tone shifts in act 4, scene 5.

Analyze how Shakespeare uses the plot to develop the theme of fate in act 5, scenes 1–2.

Analyze the degree to which fate shaped the deaths of the protagonists.

Develop an opinion about the significance of the final scene and its relationship to earlier scenes.

Discussion & Writing

Discuss and debate the essential thematic questions of the unit.

Create a free account to access thousands of lesson plans.

Already have an account? Sign In

Request a Demo

See all of the features of Fishtank in action and begin the conversation about adoption.

Learn more about Fishtank Learning School Adoption.

Contact Information

School information, what courses are you interested in, are you interested in onboarding professional learning for your teachers and instructional leaders, any other information you would like to provide about your school.

Effective Instruction Made Easy

Effective Instruction Made Easy

Access rigorous, relevant, and adaptable ELA lesson plans for free

romeo and juliet act 4 lessons

IMAGES

  1. Romeo and Juliet: Act 4, Scene 2

    romeo and juliet act 4 lessons

  2. Romeo and Juliet (IGCSE): Act 4, Scene 1

    romeo and juliet act 4 lessons

  3. Romeo and Juliet Act 4, Scene 1 Full Summary {Step by Step Guide} » ️

    romeo and juliet act 4 lessons

  4. Romeo and Juliet Act 4 Summary Notes

    romeo and juliet act 4 lessons

  5. Romeo and Juliet: Act 4 Scene 3 Juliet Analysis

    romeo and juliet act 4 lessons

  6. GCSE Romeo and Juliet Act 4 Scene 2

    romeo and juliet act 4 lessons

VIDEO

  1. Romeo and Juliet Act 4, Scene 1

  2. Romeo & Juliet • Act 3 Scene 5 • Shakespeare at Play

  3. Romeo and Juliet Act 2, Scene 3

  4. Romeo and Juliet Teaching Resources

  5. Romeo and Juliet: Act 4 Scene 3

  6. Romeo and Juliet

COMMENTS

  1. Romeo and Juliet Act 4 Summary and Analysis

    Summary Act Four, Scene One At the chapel, Paris speaks to Friar Laurence about his impending wedding to Juliet. Aware of the complications that will arise from this new match, the Friar is full of misgivings. Juliet, in search of Romeo, arrives at the chapel and finds Paris there.

  2. How to Teach Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet: Act IV

    March 3, 2017 How to Teach Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet: Act IV After reading Act III, students can't wait to see what will happen to Romeo and Juliet. Will their love prevail or will their relationship end as quickly as it began? In Act IV, Scenes I and III, it is clear that desperate times call for desperate measures.

  3. Romeo and Juliet Act 4: Scenes 1 & 2 Summary & Analysis

    Summary: Act 4, scene 1 In his cell, Friar Lawrence speaks with Paris about the latter's impending marriage to Juliet. Paris says that Juliet's grief about Tybalt's death has made her unbalanced, and that Capulet, in his wisdom, has determined they should marry soon so that Juliet can stop crying and put an end to her period of mourning.

  4. Romeo and Juliet Act 4 Lesson Plan

    Romeo and Juliet Act 4 Lesson Plan Instructor Kevin Newton Kevin has edited encyclopedias, taught history, and has an MA in Islamic law/finance. He has since founded his own financial...

  5. Act 4

    ACT 4, SCENE 1 Paris meets with Friar Lawrence, informing him that the wedding will be held on Thursday in a supposed attempt to soothe Juliet's grief over murdered Tybalt. Juliet arrives for confession, and Paris attempts to pressure her into confessing her love for him.

  6. Romeo and Juliet

    Age range: 11-14 Resource type: Unit of work File previews JPG, 93.57 KB zip, 4.47 MB Romeo and Juliet - Act Four This Romeo and Juliet teaching resource explores Act Four in detail. It covers Act 4, Scene 1 in depth, provides a character analysis of Juliet and an exploration of the Friar's plan.

  7. Romeo and Juliet

    Act 4, scene 1 ⌜ Scene 1 ⌝ Synopsis: Paris is talking with Friar Lawrence about the coming wedding when Juliet arrives. After Paris leaves, she threatens suicide if Friar Lawrence cannot save her from marrying Paris. Friar Lawrence gives her a potion that will make her appear as if dead the morning of the wedding.

  8. Romeo & Juliet by Shakespeare: Act 4 Scene 4

    Lesson Summary. Act 4, Scene 4 of Romeo and Juliet is a short scene that shows the whole Capulet household bustling around to prepare for Juliet and Paris's wedding. Lord Capulet is especially ...

  9. Romeo and Juliet Act 4 Activities

    Paint a Feeling Act Four of this play brings up a wide variety of emotions for readers, including but not limited to sorrow, anger, and love. Ask your students to have a discussion about the...

  10. Romeo and Juliet Act 4, Scene 1 Translation

    JULIET. Tell me not, Friar, that thou hear'st of this, Unless thou tell me how I may prevent it. If in thy wisdom thou canst give no help, Do thou but call my resolution wise, 55 And with this knife I'll help it presently. [Shows him a knife] God joined my heart and Romeo's, thou our hands.

  11. Romeo and Juliet

    Toggle Contents Act and scene list. Characters in the Play ; Entire Play The prologue of Romeo and Juliet calls the title characters "star-crossed lovers"—and the stars do seem to conspire against these young lovers.Romeo is a Montague, and Juliet a Capulet. Their families are enmeshed in a feud, but the moment they meet—when Romeo and his friends attend a party at Juliet's house in ...

  12. Romeo and Juliet Act 4 Scene 5

    A lesson focusing on the discovery of Juliet after she takes the potion. The lesson covers analysis of form and structure as well as language features. International; Resources; ... Romeo and Juliet Act 4 Scene 5 - Juliet is discovered. Subject: English. Age range: 14-16. Resource type: Other. slinds. 4.75 880 reviews. Last updated. 22 February ...

  13. Supplementary Lesson Plans

    These supplemental lessons are designed to 1). Lead students towards a deeper understanding of the play's content, and 2). Engage students in critical thinking about the play's cultural context, as well as the connections students can make to their own modern experiences.

  14. Tragic Love: Introducing Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet

    Overview. This pre-reading lesson helps students expand their knowledge of Shakespeare and build an understanding of Romeo and Juliet by connecting the summary of the play to their everyday lives as teenagers. Students also explore the definition of tragedy and how "tragic love" is ingrained in the lives of teenagers from all cultures.

  15. Romeo and Juliet: Act 4, Scene 2

    Lesson Summary Frequently Asked Questions How does Juliet manipulate her father old Capulet at the beginning of Scene 2? Juliet manipulates her father by pretending to be sorry about how she...

  16. Lesson 4

    Unit 11 9th Grade Lesson 4 of 23 Objective Analyze Shakespeare's characterization of the three female characters introduced in act 1, scene 3. Readings and Materials Play: Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare — Act 1, Scene 3 (pp. 33-41) Fishtank Plus

  17. Module 3 Lessons: Romeo and Juliet

    Scene 3. Juliet retires to her chamber, and convinces her mother and nurse to leave her alone. Once she is by herself, she speaks in a soliloquy and expresses her fears about the uncertain future. Seeing no alternative to taking the potion, she overcomes her "hideous fears" and drinks the entire vial. Read Scene 3.

  18. English 1 unit 9 lesson 6 Romeo and Juliet Act 4 Flashcards

    That Juliet is better in heaven. The events in act 4 contribute to the ________ of the play. Falling action. In the ______ of a tragedy, the characters, setting, conflict, and basic situations are introduced. Exposition. In the ________, an event occurs that triggers the action of the play. Inciting moment.

  19. Romeo and Juliet Act 4, Scene 1

    Lesson Summary Frequently Asked Questions Who is responsible for Juliet's fake death? When Juliet is told she will be expected to marry Count Paris, she goes to Friar Laurence and asks for...

  20. Romeo and Juliet Act 4-5 Flashcards

    1. If the potion does not work, she will have to marry Paris. 2. She wonders if Friar gave her a potion that is too strong and that it kills her, to cover up the fact that he married her and Romeo. 3. What if she wakes up before Romeo gets there, and she has to lie there with the other dead Capulets. 4.

  21. English 1 A Lesson 2

    inciting moment. Romeo and Juliet meet at the Capulet party and fall in love. falling action. Juliet discovers her father has made arrangements for her to marry Paris in three days. Exposition. The Montagues and Capulets are engaged in a family feud. Climax. Romeo is banished for killing Tybalt. rising action.

  22. Video: Romeo & Juliet by Shakespeare Act 4 Scene 5

    In Act 4, Scene 5 of Romeo and Juliet, Juliet's nurse finds Juliet in her bed, appearing to be dead. Her parents and Paris also believe she is dead and are extremely distressed. Lord Capulet ...

  23. Lesson 4: Romeo and Juliet: Act II Flashcards

    A drama that is divided into five parts known as the Classic Model, or the Dramatic Arc: exposition, rising action, climax, falling action, and dénouement. Screenplays that follow this Five-act structure, meaning the standard screenplay can also be divided into Five parts. Sequence of events in a story. End of the story where loose ends are ...