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How to Get Started Configuring Your Network in Oracle Solaris 11

by Andrew Walton Published May 2012

This article describes some of the new features for basic Oracle Solaris 11 network configuration and shows how to use them to add a new system to a simple but typical corporate network.

The Oracle Solaris 11 network architecture is significantly different from previous releases of Oracle Solaris. Not only has the implementation changed, but so have the names of network interfaces and the commands and methods for administering and configuring them.

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These changes were introduced to bring a more consistent and integrated experience to network administration, particularly as administrators add more-complex configurations including link aggregation, bridging, load balancing, or virtual networks. In addition to the traditional fixed networking configuration, Oracle Solaris 11 introduced automatic network configuration through network profiles.

New Features of Oracle Solaris 11 Network Configuration

Oracle Solaris 11 introduced two new commands for manually administering networks, dladm and ipadm , and both supersede ifconfig . Unlike ifconfig , changes made by dladm and ipadm are persistent across reboots. They share a common, consistent command format and, unlike ifconfig , they have parseable output that can be used in scripts.

dladm performs data-link (layer 2) administration to configure physical links, aggregations, VLANs, IP tunnels, and InfiniBand partitions. It also manages link-layer properties.

ipadm configures IP interfaces, IP addresses, and TCP/IP protocol properties. It also replaces the use of ndd for network and transport layer tuning.

Data-link names are no longer the same as the physical interface, which might be a virtual device. Instead, they have generic names, such as net0 or net1 , or administrators can give them descriptive names. This allows the underlying hardware to be changed without impacting the network configuration.

In addition, Oracle Solaris 11 adds automatic network configuration using network profiles. Profiles are managed with two administrative commands— netadm and netcfg —and describe the configuration of network interfaces, name services, routing, and IP filter and IPsec policies in a single entity.

Manual and Automatic Networking Modes

Oracle Solaris 11 uses profile-based network configuration, which comprises two network configuration modes: manual and automatic.

Depending on which mode you chose during installation, either the DefaultFixed network configuration profile (NCP) or the Automatic NCP is activated on the system.

The Automatic NCP uses DHCP to obtain a basic network configuration (IP address, router, and DNS server) from any of the connected Ethernet interfaces. If this fails, it will try connecting to the best wireless network in the list of known networks.

The DefaultFixed NCP effectively disables automatic network configuration and requires the network interfaces to be manually configured using dladm and ipadm and the name services to be configured using the Oracle Solaris Service Management Facility (SMF).

It is easier to manage Oracle Solaris 11 networking by creating your own NCPs rather than using the DefaultFixed NCP and manually configuring the network.

The DefaultFixed NCP should be used on systems that will be reconfigured using Oracle Solaris Dynamic Reconfiguration or where hot-swappable interfaces are used. It must be used for IP multipathing, which is not supported when using the Automatic NCP.

You can use netadm to find out what network profiles are active on a system:

Without going into too much detail now (we will cover this in a later section), the output above shows that the Automatic NCP is enabled.

To switch to the DefaultFixed NCP and, thus, enable manual networking, run the following command:

And to switch back to the Automatic NCP, use the following command:

As the system starts to configure the data links and receives an IP address from the DHCP server, we soon get back to our original online state:

Manual Network Configuration

In the following example, we will manually configure our server to have a static IPv4 address of 10.163.198.20.

First of all, we will switch to the DefaultFixed NCP, if that hasn't been done already:

On a machine with multiple physical networks, you can use dladm to determine how network interface names are mapped to physical interfaces.

Creating a static IP address is a two-step process, and it involves creating an IP interface and an IP address. There can be multiple IP addresses associated with an IP interface. IP address objects have names in the form interface / description .

In the example shown in Listing 1, we use acme as the description.

Listing 1. Configuring a Static IP Address

We can then add a persistent default route:

Name Service Configuration Using SMF

The name service configuration is now stored and configured via SMF services instead of via configuration files in /etc . This change is part of a wider set of configuration changes in Oracle Solaris 11, which provides a greater degree of administrative auditability and control over system configuration, particularly during system updates.

The SMF service svc:/network/dns/client manages configuration information that used to be in /etc/resolv.conf . The SMF service svc:/system/name-service/switch manages configuration information that used to be in /etc/nsswitch.conf . In both cases, the configuration information is also stored in the legacy files for compatibility with other applications that might read them. You should not directly edit these legacy files. Changes made to properties are not reflected in the legacy files until the service is refreshed, restarted, or enabled.

Note : Specifying lists and strings as SMF properties requires quoting them or escaping parentheses and quotation marks to prevent the shell from interpreting them.

Example: Configuring a DNS Client Using SMF

In the following example, we configure Domain Name Service (DNS) using the svccfg command on the svc:/network/dns/client SMF service. This will give us the ability to look up IP addresses for host names and vice versa:

After we have made the configuration changes, we refresh the SMF service:

It is not necessary to set the properties for every name service database. You can use the special property config/default to provide a default value. You can individually customize entries that can't use the default value.

Example: Configuring /etc/switch.conf Using SMF

In the following example, we use the name service switch mechanism to allow our system to search through the DNS, LDAP, NIS, or local file sources for naming information. We again use the svccfg command on the svc:/system/name-service/switch SMF service:

Note : The config/host property defines both the hosts and ipnodes entries in /etc/nsswitch.conf , while the config/password property defines the passwd entry. The remaining properties have the same name as their /etc/nsswitch.conf entries.

Setting the Host Name

In Oracle Solaris 11, /etc/nodename has been removed and replaced with the config/nodename property of the svc:/system/identity:node service.

To set the host name, we again use svccfg :

Setting the host name this way will work for both automatic and manual network configurations.

Changes to /etc/hosts

In Oracle Solaris 11, the host's own entry in /etc/hosts is now the same as that of localhost . In previous versions of Oracle Solaris, this entry was associated with the first network interface.

Note : Some application installers might fail due to changes in the /etc/hosts file. If you experience this, you might have to edit /etc/hosts directly.

Automatic Network Configuration Using Profiles

In Oracle Solaris 11, network profiles help to aggregate network configuration that was scattered across multiple different configuration files in previous versions of Oracle Solaris. Switching network profiles results in a set of changes to different network configuration that is applied in a single administrative operation.

The traditional configuration files still exist for compatibility reasons only, but you should not directly edit any of these files because any modifications will be overwritten when a profile is activated or the system is rebooted.

Network Profiles

A network profile contains a Network Configuration Profile (NCP) and a Location Profile at a minimum, and it optionally contains External Network Modifiers (ENMs) and Known Wireless Networks (WLANs).

NCPs define a set of data links and IP interfaces as Network Configuration Units (NCUs). A Location Profile defines additional configuration, such as name service, IP filter rules, and IPsec policies that can be configured only after basic IP configuration.

ENMs are applications or services that directly modify the network configuration when a profile is activated or deactivated. An ENM would be needed to configure a virtual private network (VPN), for example. The use of ENMs or the configuration of wireless networks is not covered in this article.

Profiles have an activation mode that is either manual or automatic. When an automatic profile is active, external network events cause Oracle Solaris to re-evaluate which is the "best" automatic profile and make that profile active. External events include connecting or disconnecting an Ethernet cable, obtaining or losing a DHCP lease, or discovering a wireless network. There is always an active NCP and Location Profile. It is not possible to disable networking by disabling the current profile.

Creating a Network Configuration Profile

Without modification, the Automatic profile is generally unsuitable for most corporate networks, which are either static or provide more configuration information via DHCP than the Automatic profiles uses.

If your network has statically allocated IP address, you will need to create an NCP and a Location Profile.

In this example, we look at a typical corporate network of a fictional Acme corporation. It has statically allocated network addresses, uses a combination of NIS and DNS, and does not use IPv6.

To configure a system on the Acme network, we need to create an NCP and a Location Profile.

Example: Creating an NCP

To create the NCP and its component NCUs, we use netcfg . For the physical link, we accept the defaults provided by netcfg . For the IP configuration, we want IPv4 addressing and static IP address allocation, as shown in Listing 2.

Listing 2. Creating the NCP

Now we need to create the Location Profile, as shown in Listing 3. We associate the Location Profile to the network profile through its activation mode. The Location Profile will automatically activate as long as the NCP is active.

Since Acme uses a combination of NIS and DNS name services, we need to provide our own /etc/nsswitch.conf , which we will call /etc/nsswitch.acme .

Listing 3. Creating the Location Profile

Now we can activate the NCP, as shown in Listing 4, and the Location Profile will be automatically activated.

Listing 4. Activating the NCP

Editing an NCP

There are two ways to edit an existing NCP with netcfg . The set command lets you set individual properties, while the walkprop command walks you through all the properties.

netcfg automatically performs a walkprop command when you create a profile.

In example shown in Listing 5, we add a third DNS server to the existing acme.corp.loc Location Profile.

Listing 5. Adding a DNS Server

The list command shows only properties that have been set; list -a shows all the properties of the profile, as shown in Listing 6.

Listing 6. Showing All Properties

Network configuration has substantially changed in Oracle Solaris 11 with the introduction of network configuration profiles and consolidated administration across the different facets of networking fabrics in the data center. By using network configuration profiles, administrators can simplify complex configurations and apply them as a single unit of change.

For more information related to Oracle Solaris 11 network administration, see the following administration guides:

Oracle Solaris Administration: IP Services

Oracle Solaris Administration: Naming and Directory Services

Oracle Solaris Administration: Network Interfaces and Network Virtualization

Transitioning From Oracle Solaris 10 to Oracle Solaris 11

Here are some additional Oracle Solaris 11 resources:

Download Oracle Solaris 11

Access Oracle Solaris 11 product documentation

Access all Oracle Solaris 11 how-to articles

Learn more with Oracle Solaris 11 training and support

See the official Oracle Solaris blog

Follow Oracle Solaris on Facebook and Twitter

About the Author

Andrew Walton is a senior engineer in the ISV group at Oracle and has over 20 years experience in the UNIX industry working at Silicon Graphics, Sun, and Oracle. He specializes in application performance tuning and porting C and C++ code.

Revision 1.0, 05/16/2012

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How do I change the IP address and hostname on Solaris?

I found lots of Web sites with answers via Google but they referred to changing several files, some of which don't exist. I edited all the files (using Linux experience as my guide) and rebooted but Solaris simply ignores the settings.

I also tried configuring the machine via smc, but while it allowed me to rename the computer and change its IP address, those changes didn't have an actual effect and didn't survive a reboot.

This is SunOS 5.10 Generic_139556 on x64.

Andrew J. Brehm's user avatar

3 Answers 3

Yes, /etc/nodename stores the system's basic idea of its own name.

/etc/hostname. <interface> configures the network interface of that name; Solaris during boot-time enumerates those files and configures each interface based on information in there. If you use names, rather than numeric IP addresses, in those files they must be defined in /etc/hosts . What's in each file is put into an ifconfig <interface> <parameters> command. By default it's just an IP address or a domain name, and the defaults are taken for things like netmask (from /etc/inet/netmasks .) However, you can place things like netmasks, MTUs, etc. directly in those files, though it's not best practices to do so if there's a better method.

DHCP is configured for an interface if there's a /etc/dhcp. <interface> file. If you don't want DHCP any more, get rid of them.

Default route is set in /etc/defaultrouter . NIS domain, if used, is in /etc/defaultdomain , with ancillary configuration in /var/yp .

Name service priority is set in /etc/nsswitch.conf , but if you're not using NIS or LDAP or whatever, you probably don't have to change it. DNS configuration is in the standard UNIX location of /etc/resolv.conf .

If you're running IPv6 there's more, but I took the assumption you weren't.

Morven's user avatar

I think I got it.

I edited the following files:

/etc/hosts /etc/inet/netmasks /etc/resolv.conf /etc/nodename /etc/hostname.

And I deleted this file:

That did it.

  • Note that one might also need to change /etc/defaultrouter for the gateway configuration. –  abyx Jan 19, 2010 at 13:26

The last time I administered a Solaris box was on Solaris 8, so I am not sure if this is still valid...but, there was a command "sys-unconfig" that would wipe out all the host-specific information like name, timezone and IP address. It would then shutdown the system and when you rebooted would step you through the setup as if it were a newly installed box.

Alex's user avatar

  • Solaris 10 has a programm named smc (Solaris Management Console) which connects to a computer and configures it. Except that it doesn't. –  Andrew J. Brehm Oct 8, 2009 at 12:32
  • 1 Yes, sys-unconfig is the "official" way to do this. However, it wipes out a bunch more stuff which might be a pain in the behind. –  Morven Oct 13, 2009 at 22:25

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how to change ip address solaris 11

how to change ip address solaris 11

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how to change ip address solaris 11

Solaris 11 Network IP Configuration

Table Of Contents

How To Add Static IP To An Existing Network Interface

How To Remove A Static IP From The Network Interface

There's an article on Solaris 11 Basic Network Configuration in Oracle's TechNet that discusses the configuration of IPs. What that article didn't cover is the idea of adding static IPs to an existing network interface configured in Auto NCP with a DHCP IP which made me wonder if this is possible. The following are the procedures to prove this approach.

Solaris 11 uses NCP (Network Configuration Profile) in two modes Automatic NCP using DHCP and manual DefaultFixed NCP.

In my case, my Solaris 11 is on Automatic NCP which uses the DHCP IP provided by the VMware Fusion.

Step 1: Gather Existing Network info:

root@s11node1:~# ipadm show- if

IFNAME     CLASS    STATE    ACTIVE OVER

lo0        loopback ok       yes    - -

net0       ip       ok       yes    - -

net1       ip       ok       yes    - -

root@s11node1:~#

root@s11node1:~# ifconfig - a

lo0: flags=2001000849<UP,LOOPBACK,RUNNING,MULTICAST,IPv4,VIRTUAL> mtu 8232 index 1

        inet 127.0.0.1 netmask ff000000

net0: flags=100001004843<UP,BROADCAST,RUNNING,MULTICAST,DHCP,IPv4,PHYSRUNNING> mtu 1500 index 2

        inet 172.16.33.120 netmask ffffff00 broadcast 172.16.33.255

        ether 0:c:29:1b:7a:7b

net1: flags=100001004843<UP,BROADCAST,RUNNING,MULTICAST,DHCP,IPv4,PHYSRUNNING> mtu 1500 index 3

        inet 192.168.65.111 netmask ffffff00 broadcast 192.168.65.255

        ether 0:50:56:21:49:12

lo0: flags=2002000849<UP,LOOPBACK,RUNNING,MULTICAST,IPv6,VIRTUAL> mtu 8252 index 1

        inet6 ::1/128

net0: flags=120002004841<UP,RUNNING,MULTICAST,DHCP,IPv6,PHYSRUNNING> mtu 1500 index 2

        inet6 fe80::20c:29ff:fe1b:7a7b/10

net1: flags=120002004841<UP,RUNNING,MULTICAST,DHCP,IPv6,PHYSRUNNING> mtu 1500 index 3

        inet6 fe80::250:56ff:fe21:4912/10

root@s11node1:~# ipadm show- addr

ADDROBJ           TYPE     STATE        ADDR

lo0/v4            static   ok           127.0.0.1/8

net0/v4           dhcp     ok           172.16.33.120/24

net1/v4           dhcp     ok           192.168.65.111/24

lo0/v6            static   ok           ::1/128

net0/v6           addrconf ok           fe80::20c:29ff:fe1b:7a7b/10

net1/v6           addrconf ok           fe80::250:56ff:fe21:4912/10

Step 2. Assign a static IP to an interface.

Let's assign 172.16.33.99 to net0 interface to manually add a static IP to an interface configured with DHCP IP.

ipadm create- addr [- t] [- T static] [- d]

          - a {local|remote}=addr[/prefixlen],... addrobj | interface

          

root@s11node1:~# ipadm create- addr - T static - a 172.16.33.99/24 net0/testvip

net0/testvip      static   ok           172.16.33.99/24

net0:1: flags=100001000843<UP,BROADCAST,RUNNING,MULTICAST,IPv4,PHYSRUNNING> mtu 1500 index 2

        inet 172.16.33.99 netmask ffffff00 broadcast 172.16.33.255

The above proves that we can assign additional public vip to an existing DHCP configured interface.

Step 1: Get the AddrObj name of the IP.

Step 2: Remove the IP configuration via the AddrObj name.

root@s11node1:~# ipadm delete- addr net0/testvip

Main Menu

  • How to Change an IP Address on Solaris

To change an IP address on a Solaris system immediately, use the `ifconfig` command.

The syntax for `ifconfig` is:

ifconfig <interface> <ip address> <netmask> <broadcast address>

If the user does not know his/her network interface names, he/she should use the `ifconfig -a` command to list all of the available network interfaces.

Permanently Change an IP Address on Solaris

To make this change permanent, users need to edit one or more Solaris configuration files. If they do not, then their IP address will change back to the old address the next time the system is rebooted.

Edit the hosts entry in /etc/hosts.

If the system is moved to a new network, change the default route in /etc/defaultrouter.

If using VLSM (Variable Length Subnet Masks), users may need to edit /etc/netmasks.

If using Solaris 9 or above, users may need to edit the IP address in /etc/inet/ipnodes.

Reboot the server to test the changes and ensure that they operate correctly.

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Solaris 11 – How to Create VNIC and Assign a IP ?

July 3, 2013 By Lingesh Leave a Comment

how to change ip address solaris 11

How to assign Static IP address in Solaris 11? Is it possible to assign multiple IP address to NIC ? First we will the basic difference between older version of Solaris and Solaris 11. In Solaris 10, according to the NIC manufacturer,physical network interfaces are named (Ex:bge,e1000g,nxge).But in Solaris 11 onwards,the inconsistencies names are hidden from the view and all the interfaces will be named as net0,net1…netx . 

If you want to know which “netx” name has been mapped to physical interface (Ex:bge0,e1000g,nxge), you can see those information using below command.

To show all dladm level devices,including VNIC’s & aggregation links,use the below command.

In Solaris 11,you can give a meaning full description(net1/oracle_VIP) to all the IP address on the system unlike Solaris 10. (e1000g1:2)

Let see how to assign IP address to the  physical interface “net1″(e1000g1). 1.Plumb the IP interface

2.Assign the static IP address to net1.

Note: WebIP – IP description. 3.Verify  whether IP address is configured or not.

You have successfully assigned the IP address to interface net1 (e1000g1).

Now you have a question in mind that, how to assign multiple IP address to single interface (Like Solaris 10’s  – e1000g1:1,e1000g1:2…..).  ?   Solaris 11 has brought the new concept called VNIC. You can create N no of VNIC’s using single physical interface and possible to create on top of aggregation as well.These VNIC are treated as actual physical interface and possible to assign to local zones with  full access to it.It is possible to run snoop on it. You can also give a meaningful name to VNIC(virtual interface). Let’s see how can create a new VNIC using interface net2 (e1000g2). 1.List out the physical interface.

2.Create a new VNIC using net2 (e1000g2). Here the VNIC name “UnixArena1”

3.Plumb the virtual interface

4. Assign a IP address to VNIC. (Like a physical interface) and verfiy.

5.Let me try to run snoop on VNIC which we have create now.

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Solaris 10 – Change IP Address without reboot

Adding or editing the IP address on a Solaris 10 server is different from the previous versions of the OS (Solaris 9, Solaris 8 etc).

In the previous versions of the Solaris Operating System, you need to edit the /etc/hosts file and add/edit the entry for the IP address and the hostname.

192.168.1.1   sun1

However, in Solaris 10, you should edit the /etc/hosts file (a symlink to /etc/inet/hosts file ) and the  /etc/inet/ipnodes file and add an entry for IP address and hostname.

Once done, restart the Network service using

# svcadm restart network/physical

or reboot the server for the changes to take effect.

Although, the /etc/inet/ipnodes files is primarily for IPv6 only, without adding an entry to the file, the IP address (IPv4) doesn’t become active. This seems to be a known problem but the good news is this is now fixed in the Solaris 10 U4 (08/07 build).

Also, ensure that the /etc/netmasks file with the network ID and the netmask.

11 thoughts on “Solaris 10 – Change IP Address without reboot”

' src=

Thanks its usefully for me.

' src=

Thanks , it is usefull .

' src=

please send the information change ip sunsolaris

' src=

thanks a lot ,its very usefull for newbie ‘s

' src=

thanks for this info it is usefull for me

' src=

Thanks, it is very useful.

' src=

command having no effect when i change my network cable… and apply this command..

' src=

Thanks you very much it really help me 😉

' src=

Thanks for the above info!! would appreciate if someone could help me with below query. I have Solaris 10 installed in virtualbox 4. I have configured my network as mentioned in this post. I want to make a network between 2 solaris 10 systems installed in Virtualbox OR between solaris 10 and local windows xp (host machine). If you can guide and advise what steps to be performed to achieve target will be highly appreciated.

Also, below are the details/query i would like to know/update. 1) what will be my default gateway when my ip is 10.10.12.1? 2) I am using virtualbox 4. I have enable NAT in network adapter. 3) I have not defined router since confused with default gateway 4) How can i connect to internet from solaris machine installed in Virtual box

' src=

That helped a lot… Thanks

' src=

I have to change the netmask of the interface without reboot, I changed in /etc/netmasks file and I used the following commands:

ifconfig igb0 x.x.x.x netmasks newnetmask svcadm restart network/physical

But no effect at all.

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Security.org

How To Change Your IP Address

E ven though you may be in cyberspace, you’re still in a specific, virtual location defined by your IP address. But for those who want to stay private, get around government restrictions, and the like, changing your IP address is a simple first step. In this article, we’ll tell you how to change your IP address, step-by-step, along with providing you with more information about the types of IP addresses, the pros and cons of changing them, and more. Get your invisibility cloak ready because we’re about to go private or as private as you can be online.

See the exact steps to changing your IP address on an iPhone, Android, Mac and Windows computer. Also, learn why you would want to change your IP address in the first place.

» Do You Know: How to find the IP address on your iPhone

Pro Tip: Changing your IP address can help you get around website restrictions and censorship, but some apps and services use GPS location. If you’re having trouble changing your GPS location, read our Surfshark review . You’ll appreciate its GPS override feature.

What Is An IP Address?

Of course, some people may not be totally clear on what an IP address actually is; no shame here! An IP address, which standards for an internet protocol address, is a device’s identifying number associated with a specific computer or network of computers. Basically, IP addresses let computers send and receive information, but they can also be used to track the physical locations of users, 4 a nightmare for those concerned with privacy. And according to our VPN usage research , that accounts for 40 percent of VPN-users.

» How To: Get a US IP Address

Types of IP Addresses

Not all IP addresses are created equal! Rather, they can be divided into a few different categories, some of which have certain advantages over others.

  • Public : Each and every internet-connected device has a public IP address, distributed by the Internet Service Providers vis-à-vis the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers. What, you haven’t heard of ICANN? Nevertheless, these public IP addresses are searchable on the web, which is why we can find our printer simply by Googling its IP address .
  • Private/ local : In contrast to public IP addresses, private IP addresses aren’t searchable on the web. Rather, they’re numbers that routers assign the devices on their networks so that they can communicate with each other.
  • Dynamic : Dynamic IP addresses, as we mentioned before, are any type of IP address that change every time you connect, usually through a VPN. This makes users hard to track online, as their literal address keeps changing.
  • Static : Static means that the IP addresses do not change. With VPNs, static IP addresses are usually shared with thousands of users in order to obscure their identities. However, some websites block these shared IP addresses, which necessitates users getting dedicated IP addresses. What a convenient transition!
  • Dedicated : Dedicated IP addresses are assigned to only one user rather than being shared by several. They usually cost a different fee on top of the regular VPN subscription.
  • IPv4 : Internet Protocol version 4 is used by 99 percent of networks, but since it can only store 4.3 billion addresses, it’s being replaced by IPv6, which we’ll get to in a second. Unlike IPv6, IPv4 addresses are four one bite numbers separated by dots like 555.555.1.1.
  • IPv6 : While they’re only used by less than 1 percent of networks, IPv6 has its advantages over IPv4, namely that it can provide an infinite number of addresses. It also allows for larger payloads and is compatible with a greater number of mobile networks. Although they’re starting small, eventually, IPv6 will replace IPv4. 5

» Further Reading: Dynamic vs Static IP Address

Where To Find Your IP Address

Feeling lost in the sauce? Finding your IP address isn’t that complicated, even if you’re not a tech expert like us.

Your private information

My ip address.

20.237.210.148

Unprotected

My IP Information

Internet provider:

MICROSOFT-CORP-MSN-AS-BLOCK

Region/ State:

Hide my IP address

View IP Details

Browser name:

Browser version:

Device brand:

Device type:

Postal code:

Where to Find Your IP Address on Mac

  • Enter your Mac’s System Settings.
  • Select Network.
  • Select your Wi-Fi network.
  • Click Details…
  • You’ll see your IP internal address listed.

Where to Find Your IP Address on Windows

  • Enter your TaskBar.
  • Click on Settings.
  • Select your network.
  • Click Wi-Fi Properties.
  • Look under IPv4 Address.

Where to Find Your IP Address on Android

  • Enter your phone’s Settings.
  • Click About.
  • Click Status.
  • Look at the IP Address.

Where to Find Your IP Address on iOS

  • Click Settings.
  • Click Wi-Fi.
  • Click on the “i” button next to Network.

Pros and Cons of Changing Addresses

Of course, there’s always the debate of whether or not to change your IP address in the first place. While the angel on your shoulder tells you it’s a great way to increase your privacy and access other country’s servers, the devil tells you that it could be costly, that some websites won’t work and that your ISP will still be able to see your address. There’s truth to both of these sides, so we recommend making your decisions on a case-by-case basis. That being said, we broke down the main reasons why you should and shouldn’t change your IP address.

» How To: Get a UK IP Address

Why You Should Change Your IP Address

  • Avoid tracking : If you’ve ever searched for anything related to consumerism, then you probably already notice how your searches seem to follow you around the internet like you owe them money. This sort of tracking is made possible by cookies, which some antivirus software can disable.
  • Bypass government restrictions : Governments like China greatly restrict internet usage in their country, so if you want to bypass firewalls, changing your IP address is a must.
  • Access international servers : Maybe you simply want to see what’s on Netflix Canada from your apartment in California. By changing your IP address to a Canadian one, you can trick the streaming giant into showing you a whole lot of new content.
FYI: Not all VPNs are compatible with Netflix. To find one that’s right for you, read our review of the best VPNs for Netflix .
  • Gain privacy : Maybe you’re an activist, a journalist, or anyone else handling sensitive information, or maybe you just don’t want your Internet Service Provider to track your every move. If that’s the case, changing your IP address is a step in the right direction in terms of privacy.
  • Increase security : Most people think nothing of joining public Wi-Fi networks (and depending on your settings, this may even happen automatically). However, using public Wi-Fi opens up a slew of security risks, with hacking at the forefront. But by hiding your real IP address, you greatly lower your risk of hackings .

Why You Shouldn’t Change Your IP Address

  • Some websites won’t work : Some websites, like the aforementioned Netflix, won’t work with certain VPNs or proxies. So while they may be able to bypass government restrictions, that doesn’t stop individual websites from blocking certain IP addresses.
  • Not always legal : Depending on where you are, VPNs may not be legal ; they’re banned in China, Belarus, Iran and a few other countries, so keep that in mind before you connect.
  • May slow down connection : Any added encryption will slow down your browsing speeds, although the exact slowdowns will differ from service to service. Still, if you’re performing tasks that require a lot of bandwidth like streaming video or video chatting, you might experience some frustrating lag.
  • VPN may log data : Again, depending on the service, your VPN company may be logging the very information you want to hide, like your IP address and web traffic. Our advice? Always read the VPN’s privacy policy, which we cover in our individual VPN reviews, and talk about it extensively on our best no-logging VPNs page.
  • Could cost money : Not all VPNs are free (except of course, the ones that are; check out the best free VPNs to see what we’re talking about). Still, free VPNs typically have limits on time, data, or servers, so if you want full coverage, you might have to pony up some dough.
  • ISP’s will still be able to see IP : Even with a new IP address, your Internet Service Provider will be able to see it, so you’re never truly “private” when you’re online.

» Learn more: All about ISP Throttling

Overall, we’re of the faith that changing your IP address is a necessity at times, and we love that there’s more than one way to do it. We hope we answered all of your questions about changing your IP address, but if we didn’t, read on.

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  • Configuring and Managing Network Components in Oracle ® Solaris 11.4

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  • Document Information
  • Using This Documentation
  • Product Documentation Library
  • Chapter 1 About Network Administration in Oracle Solaris
  • What's New in Network Configuration
  • Removal of the WiFi Device Drivers and Framework
  • Removal of WEP Support
  • SMF Management of Persistent Network Configuration
  • Removal of Network Profiles and Locations
  • Support for Dynamic MAC Addresses and VLAN IDs
  • Naming of Persistent (Static) Routes
  • Support for Aggregation of SR-IOV-Enabled Interfaces
  • Support for Port-Based Authentication on Wired Datalinks
  • Description of the Oracle Solaris Network Protocol Stack
  • Using Rights Profiles to Perform Network Configuration
  • Oracle Solaris Network Administration Commands
  • dladm Command
  • ipadm Command
  • route Command
  • netcfg and netadm Commands
  • Required Information to Configure an Oracle Solaris System on the Network
  • Resources for Network Administration in Oracle Solaris
  • Chapter 2 Administering Datalink Configuration in Oracle Solaris
  • About Datalink Configuration
  • Rules for Valid Link Names
  • Administering Datalink Properties
  • Displaying General Information About Datalinks
  • Displaying a System's Datalinks
  • Displaying the Physical Attributes of Datalinks
  • Deleting a Datalink
  • Obtaining Runtime Statistics for Datalinks
  • Customizing Datalink Properties
  • Enabling Support for Jumbo Frames
  • Modifying Link Speed Parameters
  • Setting the STREAMS Module on Datalinks
  • Obtaining Status Information for Datalink Properties
  • Displaying Datalink Properties
  • Displaying Ethernet Property Values
  • Additional dladm Configuration Tasks
  • How to Move IP Configuration From One Network Device to Another Device
  • How to Replace a Network Interface Card With Dynamic Reconfiguration
  • SPARC: How to Ensure That the MAC Address of Each Interface Is Unique
  • Chapter 3 Configuring and Administering IP Interfaces and Addresses in Oracle Solaris
  • About the ipadm Command

Configuring IPv4 Interfaces

How to configure an ipv4 interface.

  • Configuring IPv6 Interfaces
  • How to Configure a System for IPv6
  • Using Temporary Addresses for an IPv6 Interface
  • How to Configure a Temporary IPv6 Address
  • Configuring an IPv6 Token
  • How to Configure a User-Specified IPv6 Token
  • Administering Default Address Selection
  • How to Administer the IPv6 Address Selection Policy Table
  • Customizing IP Interface Properties and Addresses
  • Setting the MTU Property
  • Enabling Packet Forwarding
  • Customizing IP Address Properties
  • Disabling, Removing, and Modifying IP Interface Configuration
  • Removing an IP Interface Configuration
  • Disabling an IP Interface Configuration
  • Modifying an IP Interface Configuration
  • How to Modify an Existing IP Address
  • Monitoring IP Interfaces and Addresses
  • Obtaining General Information About IP Interfaces
  • Obtaining Information About IP Interfaces
  • Obtaining Information About IP Interface Properties
  • Obtaining Information About IP Addresses
  • Obtaining Information About IP Address Properties
  • Migrating From an IPv4 Network to an IPv6 Network
  • Chapter 4 Administering Naming and Directory Services on an Oracle Solaris System
  • Overview of Naming and Directory Services Configuration
  • About the name-service/switch SMF Service
  • Configuring a DNS Client
  • How to Configure a DNS Client in Oracle Solaris
  • Enabling Multicast DNS
  • Advertising Resources for DNS
  • Importing Naming Services Configuration
  • Resetting SMF Naming Services Configuration
  • Chapter 5 Administering External Network Modifiers in Oracle Solaris
  • About ENM Configuration
  • Enabling and Disabling ENMs
  • Configuring ENMs
  • Configuring ENMs Interactively
  • How to Create an ENM Interactively
  • Configuring ENMs in Command-Line Mode
  • Working in the netcfg Command-File Mode
  • Administering ENMs
  • Setting Property Values for ENMs
  • How to Set ENM Property Values Interactively
  • Obtaining Information About ENM Configuration
  • Listing Property Values for an Individual ENM
  • How to List All of the Property Values for an ENM Interactively
  • Obtaining a Specific Property Value for an ENM
  • How to Obtain a Specific Property Value for an ENM
  • Setting Property Values for an ENM by Using the walkprop Subcommand
  • How to Use the walkprop Subcommand to View and Set Property Values for an ENM
  • Displaying Information About ENMs
  • Removing ENMs From the System
  • How to Remove an ENM Interactively
  • Exporting an ENM Configuration
  • Restoring an Exported ENM Configuration
  • Chapter 6 Administering Wireless Networks in Oracle Solaris
  • Connecting to and Monitoring a WiFi Network
  • How to Connect to a WiFi Network
  • How to Monitor a WiFi Link
  • Administering Known WLANs
  • About Known WLANs
  • Creating and Administering Known WLANs
  • Creating a Known WLAN
  • Displaying Configuration Information for a Known WLAN
  • Setting Properties for a Known WLAN
  • Deleting a Known WLAN
  • Managing Known WLAN Behavior at Boot Time
  • Establishing Secure WiFi Communications
  • Appendix A Datalink Properties
  • Name Changes of Datalink Properties
  • SMF Management of Network Configuration
  • Index A
  • Index B
  • Index C
  • Index D
  • Index E
  • Index I
  • Index J
  • Index L
  • Index M
  • Index N
  • Index P
  • Index R
  • Index S
  • Index W

Configuring IP interfaces enables a system to connect to the network. The procedure essentially involves assigning IP addresses to the interfaces.

When you assign an IP address to an IP interface, a corresponding address object is created to represent that address.

The address object uses the format interface / address-family , where address-family is either v4 or v6 . For example, net0 with an IPv4 address would have the address object net0/v4 . Multiple address objects of the same IP interface are distinguished by a letter suffix, such as net0/v4a , net0/v4b , net0/v4c , and so on.

Similarly, an IP interface with IPv6 addresses would have address objects such as net1/v6a , net1/v6b , and so on.

Any subsequent command on this interface's address can use the address object as reference. For instance, using an address object from the previous examples, you would type ipadm delete-addr net0/v4b .

Before You Begin

Ensure that your role has the appropriate rights profile to perform this procedure. See Using Rights Profiles to Perform Network Configuration .

The interface name follows the datalink name on which the interface is created.

This syntax is the most commonly used to configure networking on a system. However, two other create subcommands are available for other types of configuration:

create-vni creates a STREAMS virtual network interface.

create-ipmp creates an IPMP group. See Chapter 2, About IPMP Administration in Administering TCP/IP Networks, IPMP, and IP Tunnels in Oracle Solaris 11.4 .

Use one of the following commands depending on the type of address:

The address can be in Classless Inter-Domain Routing (CIDR) notation.

  • Configure a dynamic address. $ ipadm create-addr -T dhcp interface

See also Monitoring IP Interfaces and Addresses that show how to obtain interface information by using show-* subcommands.

The entries in this file consist of IP addresses and their corresponding host names.

The following example shows how to configure an IPv4 interface with a static IP address. The example also shows how to configure a persistent route for the interface by using the route command.

In the following example, the IP interface is configured to receive its address from a DHCP server. DHCP typically also installs a default route. Therefore, this example does not include a step for manually adding a default route by using the route command.

IMAGES

  1. How to change IP address in Solaris 11

    how to change ip address solaris 11

  2. Change Ip Address Of Solaris 11 Server

    how to change ip address solaris 11

  3. How to change IP address on Solaris 11 ~ The Infra Diary

    how to change ip address solaris 11

  4. Change ip address in solaris 11

    how to change ip address solaris 11

  5. Manual / Static IP Address Configuration Solaris 11

    how to change ip address solaris 11

  6. How To Configure An IP Address in Solaris 11

    how to change ip address solaris 11

VIDEO

  1. Oracle Solaris 11.2 install on VirtualBox

  2. Automatically change IP address in every 10 second

  3. How to change IP address on M7310DW via WI-FI connection

  4. How to Change IP Address or Assign a Static IP Address on Windows 7, 8.1, 10, 11 #ipaddress #pcs

  5. How To Change IP Address On Windows 11

  6. How to Setup Proxifier to change IP Address/Country/Location to Replace VPN

COMMENTS

  1. Changing a Host Name or IP Address on the Solaris OS

    Overview This tech tip shows how to change the host name or IP address of a system running the Solaris OS. This information is sourced in part from Sun InfoDoc 21252, "How to Change the hostname and/or IP Address Without Running the sys-unconfig Command". Option 1: Using sys-unconfig

  2. Changing the IP Address in Solaris 11

    Changing the IP Address in Solaris 11 Ask Question Asked 11 years, 6 months ago Modified 8 years, 7 months ago Viewed 25k times 2 I am trying to change the IP address in Solaris, but am failing to do so. The IP address needs to be a fixed number, like 10..11.10

  3. How to Get Started Configuring Your Network in Oracle Solaris 11

    The DefaultFixed NCP effectively disables automatic network configuration and requires the network interfaces to be manually configured using dladm and ipadm and the name services to be configured using the Oracle Solaris Service Management Facility (SMF).

  4. How do I change the IP address and hostname on Solaris?

    3 Answers Sorted by: 2 Yes, /etc/nodename stores the system's basic idea of its own name. /etc/hostname. <interface> configures the network interface of that name; Solaris during boot-time enumerates those files and configures each interface based on information in there.

  5. How to change IP address in Solaris 11

    How to change IP address in Solaris 11 ~-~~-~~~-~~-~ Please watch: "Setup a Site to Site IPSec VPN with Strongswan on Ubuntu" • Who To Setup a Site To Site IPSEC | Z... ~-~~-~~~-~~-~...

  6. Solaris 11 Network IP Configuration

    Solaris 11 uses NCP (Network Configuration Profile) in two modes Automatic NCP using DHCP and manual DefaultFixed NCP. In my case, my Solaris 11 is on Automatic NCP which uses the DHCP IP provided by the VMware Fusion. Step 1: Gather Existing Network info: root@s11node1:~# ipadm show-if. IFNAME CLASS STATE ACTIVE OVER.

  7. Manual / Static IP Address Configuration Solaris 11

    This video will guide you on how to configure Static or Manual IP Address on Solaris 11.

  8. How to Change an IP Address on Solaris

    Permanently Change an IP Address on Solaris. To make this change permanent, users need to edit one or more Solaris configuration files. If they do not, then their IP address will change back to the old address the next time the system is rebooted. Edit the hosts entry in /etc/hosts. If the system is moved to a new network, change the default ...

  9. Solaris 11 Network Configuration with ipadm

    More videos like this online at http://www.theurbanpenguin.comWith Solaris 11 we can use ipadm to configure the IP Address of an interface at the command lin...

  10. Solaris 11 change IP in zone

    1 From the global zone, you might check the output of: $ dladm | grep <zone-name> $ dladm show-linkprop <zone-name>/<iface> zonename/aggr0 allowed-ips rw 10.2.42.142 10.2.42.142 -- -- Then, you should be able to change it using: $ dladm set-linkprop -p allowed-ips=10.x.y.z zonename/aggr0

  11. Configuring and Administering IP Interfaces and Addresses in Oracle Solaris

    For information about administering TCP/IP properties such global packet forwarding and transport layer services, see Administering Transport Layer Services in Administering TCP/IP Networks, IPMP, and IP Tunnels in Oracle Solaris 11.4.

  12. Solaris 11

    How to assign Static IP address in Solaris 11? Is it possible to assign multiple IP address to NIC ? First we will the basic difference between older version of Solaris and Solaris 11.In Solaris 10, according to the NIC manufacturer,physical network interfaces are named (Ex:bge,e1000g,nxge).But in Solaris 11 onwards,the inconsistencies names are hidden from the view and all the interfaces will ...

  13. Solaris 10

    192.168.1.1 sun1 However, in Solaris 10, you should edit the /etc/hosts file (a symlink to /etc/inet/hosts file) and the /etc/inet/ipnodes file and add an entry for IP address and hostname. Once done, restart the Network service using # svcadm restart network/physical or reboot the server for the changes to take effect.

  14. How To Change Your IP Address

    ISP's will still be able to see IP: Even with a new IP address, your Internet Service Provider will be able to see it, so you're never truly "private" when you're online. » Learn more ...

  15. Configuring and Managing Network Components in Oracle ® Solaris 11.4

    Chapter 1 About Network Administration in Oracle Solaris What's New in Network Configuration <?nopagebreak.start> Removal of the WiFi Device Drivers and Framework Removal of WEP Support SMF Management of Persistent Network Configuration Removal of Network Profiles and Locations Support for Dynamic MAC Addresses and VLAN IDs